Honoring George Floyd By Spotlighting Black Voices

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"Stay far from timid/ Only make moves when you're heart's in it/ And live the phrase the sky's the limit." - The Notorious B.I.G.

One of the major sentiments that emerged following the killing of George Floyd two years ago was that racism and racial inequities were not problems to be solved exclusively by Black Americans. White people, specifically, have a key role — if not the main role — in addressing these issues.

While that sentiment remains strong, For(bes) the Culture decided to commemorate Floyd's death by focusing on the unique and informative perspectives of Black people. We have three stories where we're providing space for Black voices to reflect on what's changed these past 24 months, what hasn't changed, and how they feel about it all.

In one piece, we've partnered with The Harris Poll to survey Black Americans on their feelings about safety, stress and racial equity efforts. One notable finding: while three in five Black Americans feel safe in this country, a third of respondents said they feel less safe today than they did two years ago. (And this poll was conducted before the May 14 shooting massacre in Buffalo that killed 10 people, including eight Black people.) Raquel "Rocky" Harris has this story.

The second piece is a series of "As Told To" interviews, put together by Forbes staff writers. In it, we've interviewed 11 Black leaders — including activist DeRay McKesson, marketing executive Bozoma Saint John and attorney Theodore Wells Jr. — on how Floyd's killing changed society and even themselves.

In the last piece, I explore how the dialogue about racial equity has changed a lot, but changes in outcomes really haven't. Folks should know symbolic victories don't really move the needle and patronizing never works, but somehow we still got pitched Juneteenth ice cream from Walmart. (The company nixed the plans and apologized).

In addition to our George Floyd package, we encourage you to check out or new live interview series dubbed "Black Capital and Culture," where I'll speak with Black leaders and luminaries about business, culture, life and where things are headed. I can't end without paying homage to the late, great Christopher "Biggie Smalls" Wallace, who would've been 50 this month. Here's a dope conversation on Sway's Universe with Wallace's son, C.J., and journalist/author Justin Tinsley.

Stay up!

Jared Council

Jared Council

Senior Editor, For(bes) The Culture

Two Years After George Floyd, Black Leaders Reflect On Change
 
 
Two Years After George Floyd, Black Leaders Reflect On Change

George Floyd became a powerful symbol of persistent inequality and systemic injustice against Black Americans and a wake-up call for all. In an effort to capture the reality of being Black in America, For(bes) The Culture decided to speak with leaders in the community. Here are some of their reflections on the post-Floyd era.

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We Asked Black Americans: How Safe Do You Feel Two Years After George Floyd's Murder? Here Are Their Answers
 
 
We Asked Black Americans: How Safe Do You Feel Two Years After George Floyd's Murder? Here Are Their Answers

Nearly six in 10 Black Americans said they feel safe, according to a Harris Poll survey conducted exclusively for For(bes) the Culture. However, one-third said they feel less safe than they did two years ago. One reason: law enforcement officers have killed 549 Black people since 2020. 

Read The Full Story Here →
Despite Post-Floyd Era Promises, Limited Gains In Racial Equity
 
 
Despite Post-Floyd Era Promises, Limited Gains In Racial Equity

Despite an evolution in the dialogue and effort over the past 24 months, there's been little progress in outcomes for Black lives and livelihoods.

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Envisioning A Better Future: How The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society Is Expanding What's Possible For Patients And Their Families
 
 
Envisioning A Better Future: How The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society Is Expanding What's Possible For Patients And Their Families

A hematologist pioneering blood cancer treatments. A young survivor giving back after beating leukemia. A patient advocate organizing to achieve equitable care. Meet three standouts who are partnering with the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society to fight the battle against blood cancer, and learn what inspires them to give their all for a brighter, healthier future for patients and their families.

Read Their Stories →

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"I was born in 1950 ... If somebody had told me at 18 that we would still be fighting in 2022 with such intensity about violence against Black men and women, I'm not sure I would have believed it."

Theodore V. Wells Jr.

Attorney and chairman emeritus of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund

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