Thursday, June 30, 2022

Monitoring remote workers

To speed up your productivity, slow down. ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ 
INC. THIS MORNING
 
 
Monitoring remote workers

Good morning,

If your employees feel like they're under constant scrutiny, you're less likely to retain them. More than half of workers would leave their jobs if their employer insisted on recording audio or video of them, or used facial recognition to monitor their productivity, according to a May 2022 survey by the Washington, D.C.-based business intelligence company Morning Consult.

There are multiple reasons why as a business owner you might feel the need to go all Big Brother. Perhaps your company has recently switched to remote work, so you can no longer physically observe what workers are doing all day. But such surveillance-style monitoring is not the answer. Read on for more about how leaders can effectively and ethically track their employees' productivity.
 
 
Join Series Host Beatrice Dixon and Angelica Ross in Conversation

Angelica Ross of TransTech Social Enterprises is Inc.’s next guest for the Your Next Move web series. Register for the June 30 (today) at 12 PM ET webinar.

 
 

 
A MESSAGE FROM inc.
Join Inc. Unlimited
Get practical advice, strategies, best practices right from the leaders who are building businesses every day.
Subscribe Today
 
 
Here's what else I'm reading today:
Here are three predictions for how A.I. will change business practices in the near future. –Inc.
 
The NFT party is not over; it's just on ice. Here's how to weather the elements. –Inc.
 
Expanding internationally? Make sure you’re up to date on the latest requirements so you don’t end up with hefty fines. –Inc.
 
For high-achieving professionals working in competitive fields, it’s important to find the best way to preserve your mental resilience. –Fast Company
 
In the quest to retain workers, companies are sharpening their focus on a very specific common goal: 90 days. –WSJ
One more thing:

To speed up your productivity, slow down. –Inc.
 
 
This newsletter was written by Inc. associate editor Brit Morse. How are we doing? Send us ideas and feedback on Twitter.

Did someone forward you this newsletter? Subscribe here.
 
Join the visionaries who choose Inc. as their trusted source for the most accurate reporting on business.
Subscribe
 
7 World Trade Center
29th Floor
New York, NY, 10007
LinkedIn Facebook Twitter
This email was sent by Mansueto Ventures.

To update your profile, click here. If you do not wish to receive email communications please click here to manage your subscriptions. To view our privacy policy, click here.

Copyright © 2022 Mansueto Ventures LLC. All rights reserved.
Link

July 4th Exclusive: The Best $49 You'll Ever Spend

This advisory has returned a massive 617% since inception compared to the 178% return from the S&P 500

Wednesday, June 29, 2022

Tesla Factories Burn Through Skepticism

Also: Floating Solar: The Most Practical Green Technology?

4 ways to make the office work again

Entrepreneurs are different than everyone else in these five ways. ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ 
INC. THIS MORNING
 
 
4 ways to make the office work again

Good morning,

Pandemic-driven social-distancing, the fierce competition for talent, and near-record high inflation have changed the way many businesses function. As a result, you now need to reconsider where and how your organization works and what improvements you need to make to keep employees around. 

You may be able to save money by reducing office space and helping inflation-pinched workers hold onto the cash they would otherwise spend on commuting. Or you may be able to operate without owning or leasing real estate. Another option may be to rent spaces where employees can get together occasionally to brainstorm and reinforce your company's culture. If you’re looking to switch up how your company functions, here are four workplace models you should consider in this post-pandemic era.
 
 
Join Series Host Beatrice Dixon and Angelica Ross in Conversation

Angelica Ross of TransTech Social Enterprises is Inc.’s next guest for the Your Next Move web series. Register for the June 30 at 12 PM ET webinar.

 
 

 
A MESSAGE FROM inc.
Join Inc. Unlimited
Get practical advice, strategies, best practices right from the leaders who are building businesses every day.
Subscribe Today
 
 
Here's what else I'm reading today:
Despite rising concerns around a recession, many small businesses report that they feel prepared to weather any upcoming economic uncertainty. –Inc.
 
Do you have ideas for a new product? Licensing can help you bring them to market inexpensively at scale. –Inc.
 
Emotionally intelligent people use the five rules of empathetic listening to build stronger, deeper relationships. –Inc.

Assaults at stores have been increasing at a faster pace than the national average. Some workers are tired of fearing for their safety. –NYT

For high-achieving professionals working in competitive fields, it’s important to find the best way to preserve your mental resilience. –Fast Company
One more thing:
Entrepreneurs are different than everyone else in these five ways. –Inc.
 
 
This newsletter was written by Inc. associate editor Brit Morse. How are we doing? Send us ideas and feedback on Twitter.

Did someone forward you this newsletter? Subscribe here.
 
Join the visionaries who choose Inc. as their trusted source for the most accurate reporting on business.
Subscribe
 
7 World Trade Center
29th Floor
New York, NY, 10007
LinkedIn Facebook Twitter
This email was sent by Mansueto Ventures.

To update your profile, click here. If you do not wish to receive email communications please click here to manage your subscriptions. To view our privacy policy, click here.

Copyright © 2022 Mansueto Ventures LLC. All rights reserved.
Link

Tuesday, June 28, 2022

Showing up

Do you suffer from revenge bedtime procrastination? Try this new sleep ritual. ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ 
INC. THIS MORNING
 
 
Showing up

Good morning,

Amy Errett, chief executive of the hair-color startup she founded in 2014, Madison Reed, worked for the first decades of her career in finance, management consulting, and in venture capital. Despite those industries' reputations, it was there that she carved out her signature leadership style, which she describes as "leading with love from an open heart."

If that sounds like a mushy concept to you, here’s how she describes it: "It's really true and authentic, including having to deliver bad news," she explained on Inc.’s What I Know podcast. "I love you. So I am going to tell you the whole truth, right? I am not going to have a conversation that isn't direct, open, loving, from the intent of the heart."

Read on for how Errett plans to maintain her leadership approach–even as Madison Reed uses a newly raised $33 million in venture capital to hire more than 850 more people this year.
 

Join Series Host Beatrice Dixon and Angelica Ross in Conversation

Angelica Ross of TransTech Social Enterprises is Inc.’s next guest for the Your Next Move web series. Register for the June 30 at 12 PM ET webinar.
 
 
 
Here's what else I'm reading today:
A Yale expert on three tips to nail your next negotiation. –Inc.
 
Microsoft thinks it should be easier to interrupt people during meetings, and it's kind of brilliant. –Inc.
 
In her quest to become a business coach, this founder discovered an even better startup idea. –Inc.

Reeling from competing demands from stakeholders, businesses are increasingly caught in the middle of the country’s bruising culture wars after the overturn of Roe v. Wade. –NYT
 
More and more companies have begun tracking employees. New research suggests that in some cases, that can seriously backfire. –HBR
One more thing:
Do you suffer from revenge bedtime procrastination? Try this new sleep ritual. –Inc.
 
 
This newsletter was written by Inc. associate editor Brit Morse. How are we doing? Send us ideas and feedback on Twitter.

Did someone forward you this newsletter? Subscribe here.
 
Join the visionaries who choose Inc. as their trusted source for the most accurate reporting on business.
Subscribe
 
7 World Trade Center
29th Floor
New York, NY, 10007
LinkedIn Facebook Twitter
This email was sent by Mansueto Ventures.

If you do not wish to receive email communications please click here to unsubscribe. To view our privacy policy, click here.

Copyright © 2022 Mansueto Ventures LLC. All rights reserved.
Link

How Does Shipping Work on Facebook Marketplace?

How Does Shipping Work on Facebook Marketplace? Small Business Trends     •     December 8, 2022, 2:00 pm ...